Abakuá
Matanzas Style
Cuba (in 6/8)


Tumba
(Obiapá)
 
B S - B O -
B S - B O -
Conga
(Kuchiyeremá)
 
M M S H T S
M S O O - S
Quinto
(Biankomé)
 
O O - - S S
O O - - S S
Bell (clave)
(Ekón)
 
X - X - - X
- X - X - -
Cow Bell
(Ekón)
High  
- X X - - X
X - - X - -
Low  
X - - - X -
- - X - X -
Shekere
(Erikundi)
 
X - X X - X
X X - X - -
Alternate Version
Low
 
B M - B O -
B M - B O -
Middle
 
H T S H T S
H T O O - S
High
 
O O - - - -
O O - - - -
Clave
 
X - X - - X
- X - X - -
Bell
 
X X X - X X
X - X X X -
Abakuá is an Afro-Cuban secret men's society that was founded in Havana, Cuba in the 1830s and uses the leopard as a symbol of masculine prowess in war and political authority. Its origins can be traced back to the Calabar region of West Africa, specifically the Cross River region of southeastern Nigeria and southwestern Cameroon.

Drums are a major part of the Abakuá tradition and are called the biánkomo or biankoméko. There are four drums used: tumba (obiapá), conga (kuchiyeremá) quinto (biankomé), and a solo drum (bonkoechemillá). These drums are played together with bells (ekón) and shakers (erikundi). There are two distinct styles of Abakuá, the fast-paced Havana style and the slower-paced Matanzas style.



Symbol Key
B = Bass
O = Open Tone
S = Slap
  H = Heel (palm)
T = Toe (fingers)
M = Muff (muffled tone)
  C = Clave
X = Bell
P = Palitos (stick)
Play underlined notes with your 'strong' hand.




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